Projects

  • FETOTOX: Interaction between mother-fetus exposure to environmental toxicants and risk for abnormal development. International interdisciplinary study including Greenland, Denmark, Norway and China. Funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council (2011 - still ongoing).
  • BOC: Exposure to environmental chemicals and the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer in Danish and Inuit women. Funded by Harboefonden (2010 – still ongoing).
  • ACCEPT: Adaptation to Climate Change, Environmental Pollution, and Dietary Transition. Establishment of a new Greenlandic Birth Cohort. Funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (2009 – still ongoing).
  • IPY: Does Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Increase the Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer? Focus on the Arctic Women. Funded by the Commission of the Scientific Research in Greenland (2008 – 2011).
  • EPAKT: Epidemiological assessment of the interaction between contaminant body burden, the related xenobiotic serum activity and health risk in Greenland. Funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (2008-2011).
  • Time trend of Perfluorinated Alkyl Substances (PFASs) in Arctic and Danish women. Supported by AU research fund (2009-11).
  • SAM-TREND: Comparison of contaminant data in human, animals and the atmosphere in Greenland. Funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (2011).
  • HOPE: Hormone disrupting effects of currently used pesticides. Funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (2009-2012).
  • HORM-DMAU: Hormone disrupting chemicals in Danish water streams and their effects in vivo in mussels and in vitro on receptor functions in mammalian cell lines. Funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (2010-2012).
  • ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, endocrine disrupting compounds and heavy metals in the amniotic fluid: A case-control study (2008-2012).
  • PREDATOR/UNEXPECTED: Studies POP levels, heavy metals and POP-affected receptor transactivities in Inuit with relatively high intake of species at the high trophic levels including killer whales, Polar bears and seal.